Tag Archives: Stanford Law School

U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces Case Hearing at Stanford Law School on April 7, 2011

On Thursday, April 7 at 4:00 pm, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces will be hearing oral arguments in the case of United States v. Lusk (Docket No. 11-0166/AF). The proceedings will take place in Stanford Law School (SLS) Classroom 290 and members of the SLS/Stanford community are invited to attend.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces is the highest court within the military justice system. The Court is composed of five civilian judges appointed for 15-year terms by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate. It exercises worldwide appellate jurisdiction over members of the armed forces on active duty and other persons subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Decisions by the Court are subject to direct review by the U.S. Supreme Court.

United States v. Lusk is an Air Force case involving several issues on the admissibility of laboratory reports confirming the defendant’s drug use under the Supreme Court case of Melendez-Diaz.

Greg Young, an SLS 3L and U.S. Naval Academy graduate, has submitted an amicus curiae brief to the Court and will be given 10 minutes of oral argument time.

Briefs are posted below:

Director’s Corner: From the Desk of Law Library Director Paul Lomio ~ What’s Next? Lots!

In one of my favorite TV shows, West Wing, the president of the United States would say “What’s next?” when it was time to move along to the next topic on the agenda.  What makes me think of this is the debut of Westlaw’s new and very intriguing product, WestlawNext.
WestlawNext, years in the making, is designed to make Westlaw searching more “Google-like.”  Stanford Law School is one of the very first law schools to adopt WestlawNext, so please give it a try.   The 42 students in our advanced legal research class had a sneak peek last spring with great enthusiasm (and it’s one reason why we are an early adopter).
Of course whenever one of the big computer assisted legal research giants does something innovative, the other is quick to follow.
I highly recommend that you all download the new application LexisNexis has for its Lexis for Microsoft Office tool  (at the time of this writing, it was only available for Windows machines, but software for Apple computers is coming soon).
Lexis for Microsoft Office allows you to do many things with great simplicity, such as providing direct links to full text of cases, statutes, regulations cited in any Word document — without having to deal with any search retrieval steps, just click on the link!  Lexis for Microsoft Office has many other very useful features, so I encourage you to not only download the application but also attend training sessions that our Lexis representative Jessica Bride will be conducting this fall.  For more information please visit www.lexisnexis.com/lawschool
Jessica’s contact info is: 415-601-9204; Jessica.Bride@lexisnexis.com.

In one of my favorite TV shows, West Wing, the president of the United States would say “What’s next?” when it was time to move along to the next topic on the agenda.  What makes me think of this is the debut of Westlaw’s new and very intriguing product, WestlawNext.

WestlawNext, years in the making, is designed to make Westlaw searching more “Google-like.”  Stanford Law School is one of the very first law schools to adopt WestlawNext, so please give it a try.   The 42 students in our advanced legal research class had a sneak peek last spring with great enthusiasm (and it’s one reason why we are an early adopter).

Of course whenever one of the big computer assisted legal research giants does something innovative, the other is quick to follow.

I highly recommend that you all download the new application LexisNexis has for its Lexis for Microsoft Office tool  (at the time of this writing, it was only available for Windows/PC machines, but software for Apple computers is coming soon).

Lexis for Microsoft Office allows you to do many things with great simplicity, such as providing direct links to full text of cases, statutes, regulations cited in any Microsoft Word document — without having to deal with any search retrieval steps, just click on the link!  Lexis for Microsoft Office has many other very useful features, so I encourage you to not only download the application but also attend training sessions that our Lexis representative Jessica Bride will be conducting this fall.  For more information please visit here.

Jessica’s contact info is: 415-601-9204; Jessica.Bride@lexisnexis.com.