Tag Archives: google

Power Google Searches? The Plus is Not Available Now

According to The Google Operating System blog and Lifehacker,  the plus (+) search operator used by many Google searchers is no longer available.  Searchers now need to use quotation marks to ensure that word(s) appear in the search results.

LifeHacker explains:

“When you enter a search into Google, the search engine doesn’t just search for all the web pages containing your search terms; instead, it returns what it thinks is the best match based on hundreds of factors, and the resulting page may not even contain one or more of your search terms. To explicitly specify that you want the results to include a word, you used to be able to add the + (plus) operator to the front of a term (e.g.,+hackintosh +lifehacker would ensure both terms were in all results). Now, rather than adding the + operator, you need to wrap the word or words in quotation marks (e.g., "hackintosh" "lifehacker"). (Most likely this change has something to do with Google+ and it’s +mentioning convention.)”

Director’s Corner: From the Desk of Law Library Director Paul Lomio ~ What’s Next? Lots!

In one of my favorite TV shows, West Wing, the president of the United States would say “What’s next?” when it was time to move along to the next topic on the agenda.  What makes me think of this is the debut of Westlaw’s new and very intriguing product, WestlawNext.
WestlawNext, years in the making, is designed to make Westlaw searching more “Google-like.”  Stanford Law School is one of the very first law schools to adopt WestlawNext, so please give it a try.   The 42 students in our advanced legal research class had a sneak peek last spring with great enthusiasm (and it’s one reason why we are an early adopter).
Of course whenever one of the big computer assisted legal research giants does something innovative, the other is quick to follow.
I highly recommend that you all download the new application LexisNexis has for its Lexis for Microsoft Office tool  (at the time of this writing, it was only available for Windows machines, but software for Apple computers is coming soon).
Lexis for Microsoft Office allows you to do many things with great simplicity, such as providing direct links to full text of cases, statutes, regulations cited in any Word document — without having to deal with any search retrieval steps, just click on the link!  Lexis for Microsoft Office has many other very useful features, so I encourage you to not only download the application but also attend training sessions that our Lexis representative Jessica Bride will be conducting this fall.  For more information please visit www.lexisnexis.com/lawschool
Jessica’s contact info is: 415-601-9204; Jessica.Bride@lexisnexis.com.

In one of my favorite TV shows, West Wing, the president of the United States would say “What’s next?” when it was time to move along to the next topic on the agenda.  What makes me think of this is the debut of Westlaw’s new and very intriguing product, WestlawNext.

WestlawNext, years in the making, is designed to make Westlaw searching more “Google-like.”  Stanford Law School is one of the very first law schools to adopt WestlawNext, so please give it a try.   The 42 students in our advanced legal research class had a sneak peek last spring with great enthusiasm (and it’s one reason why we are an early adopter).

Of course whenever one of the big computer assisted legal research giants does something innovative, the other is quick to follow.

I highly recommend that you all download the new application LexisNexis has for its Lexis for Microsoft Office tool  (at the time of this writing, it was only available for Windows/PC machines, but software for Apple computers is coming soon).

Lexis for Microsoft Office allows you to do many things with great simplicity, such as providing direct links to full text of cases, statutes, regulations cited in any Microsoft Word document — without having to deal with any search retrieval steps, just click on the link!  Lexis for Microsoft Office has many other very useful features, so I encourage you to not only download the application but also attend training sessions that our Lexis representative Jessica Bride will be conducting this fall.  For more information please visit here.

Jessica’s contact info is: 415-601-9204; Jessica.Bride@lexisnexis.com.

Trust Online: Young Adults’ Evaluation of Web Content

A recent study published in the International Journal of Communication (IJOC) would appear to indicate that digital natives do not have much, if any, understanding of Web searching — placing their trust unquestioningly, it seems, in Google or other brand-name search engines or websites:

Trust Online: Young Adults’ Evaluation of Web Content

Abstract:

Little of the work on online credibility assessment has considered how the information-seeking process figures into the final evaluation of content people encounter. Using unique data about how a diverse group of young adults looks for and evaluates Web content, our paper makes contributions to existing literature by highlighting factors beyond site features in how users assess credibility. We find that the process by which users arrive at a site is an important component of how they judge the final destination. In particular, search context, branding and routines, and a reliance on those in one’s networks play important roles in online information-seeking and evaluation. We also discuss that users differ considerably in their skills when it comes to judging online content credibility.

Hat tip to ResourceShelf.com.

Cross-posted on Legal Research Plus.